Home Improvement Remodeling

There are always little changes that can be made to your home. In fact, home improvement remodeling is quite popular in this day and age. Especially with all of the DIY shows on television all the time. More and more men and women are taking it upon themselves to make their homes look great. This makes a great deal of sense when you think about it. After all, it will increase the value of your humble abode, which is always a wonderful thing. The key is to do a simple walk-through of your house. This way you can observe and determine what your house needs here and there. Make a list of the home improvement remodeling projects that need to get done.

In reality, the options are endless when it comes to home improvement remodeling projects. If you have one in mind for your residential house, then why put it off. If you are willing to tackle the project on your own, or as a family, you can save a lot of money. Possibly even more than half of what contractor would charge you. It is true! There are so many people tackling DIY home improvement remodeling tasks as time moves forward. The cost for labor is atrocious, and often jacked up. There are simple and convenient home improvement stores at your disposal that can assist you with this.

Some of the places you should consider for home improvement remodeling tasks and projects are Lowes, Home Depot, BidClerk.com, and FixMiHouse.webs.com. You can find all of these businesses online with ease. If you are seeking out a contractor in your area to assist you with home improvement or remodeling projects, then you need to make certain you get several bids prior to accepting any jobs. This is always wise because some contractor professionals will charge you a great deal more for their services. It is imperative to compare their rates, and the length of time it will take them to complete a job. Never pay them fully up front, because they may decide not to complete your home improvement remodeling project.

As stated before, many people are tacking home improvement jobs on their own. Now, the key to doing this correctly is learning the right tips beforehand. For instance, if you are going to replace the flooring in your home, then you need to understand this process first. If you have carpet, find out how to remove it and dispose of it. At this point you need to know how to properly install the hardwood, tile or new carpet you are putting down. Although it does not take much to learn how to do it, the process can be challenging.

Black Beauty Standards

The black is beautiful movement has gone a long way towards reminding us that black beauty standards are as worthy of being respected and loved as any other skin color. And here’s a deep Truth (and by deep Truth I mean a truth that holds true for all cultures, for all people through all periods of time, in other words it doesn’t change according to some or other societal whim) – we are all beautiful Sacred Beings regardless of our body size or shape or it’s exterior color. Now those beauty standards are ones I can buy into!

Black beauty standards in rural Africa

I grew up, a White small country girl, in apartheid South Africa – a place where by far the majority of the population is Black. One vacation I came home from boarding school to be greated by Violet who wrapped me in her big black arms, and chortled with delight, “Utyebile kakulu ngoku!” In English she was telling me that I was very fat now. I was devastated – after all, I had gained weight but I desperately wanted to be thin. It would take me years to realize that Violet was complimenting me – her black beauty standards were very different to mine.

Part of the beauty standards in Violet’s rural Xhosa culture of the 1970’s when she passed this comment, is that ‘fat is beautiful.’ To be large in her culture was considered desirable and beautiful. It meant: you were healthy, you didn’t have AIDS. It meant you were fertile, sexy and womanly enough to attract a good husband – one who is wealthy enough to provide well. It meant you were wealthy enough to eat well.

The media and black beauty standards

What I remember most about Violet (and the other Black women who I came into daily contact with) was that they never questioned that black is beautiful – they weren’t immersed in a mainstream Western media that seems to rank skin colors and body sizes as supposedly more valued and worthy the whiter and skinnier you are.

How can any one skin color, or one body size or shape determine a person’s worth? Why would our great Creator create any one race or culture to be more Sacred than another? That’s all just nonsensical beauty standards made up by misguided humans.

Violet was my black beauty standard

I can still clearly see Violet’s ebony skin – it had a glow to it that was almost iridescent. And when she smiled (which was often) she had this row of startling white teeth all without the latest teeth whiteners. They say beauty lies in the eyes of the beholder – I loved Violet’s blackness. White wouldn’t have suited her. I loved the way she walked, tall and proud. She could balance a bucket of water on her head and walk as gracefully as a dancer.

And she made me laugh – like the one time she came across me sun-tanning and teased me about how I liked black so much that I was trying to get the sun to help me. And when I started perming my hair and she asked me why I wanted curly hair like hers.

Here’s what I think is so sensible about rural Black African women. Firstly, they don’t have scales they hop on and off of and that determine their mood for the day. They don’t swarm to shops bursting at the seams with the latest one-0-size-fits-all fashions. They don’t have mirrors that lie telling they are fat and ugly. They don’t spend hours on magazines and tv that continually bombards them with the message that only a certain shape of thin is beautiful. Their beauty standards are far more realistic.

Beauty standards can determine our stress levels

Instead they live in tune with the rhythms of the seasons and their bodies. Violet didn’t have the ongoing emotional stress of living in a large body which was continually insulted, stigmatized, hated or rejected either by themselves or others. This means her parasympathetic nervous system wasn’t constantly releasing stress chemicals (like noradrenaline, adrenaline and cortisol) into their bloodstream which would raise their health risks.

And interestingly enough, the Royal College of Physicians official medical report of 1983 found that rural Black South African women might well have a high prevalence of obesity but that it comes without the apparently inevitable poor morbidity and mortality. Makes you think about the value of living in sync with natural rhythms, rather than stressing about being skinny – doesn’t it?

Because they are immersed in their big is beautiful black beauty standards, they feel good living in their bodies. They’re thus continually flooding their biolological system with life-supporting molecules of emotion (like endorphics) that enhance their immune systems, and enhance their health.